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Upper School

Students are encouraged to explore their talents and interests beyond their classroom experiences through participation in co-curricular activities. A great variety of opportunities is available for students to develop skills in leadership and collaborative work. Each class annually elects class officers who work under the direction of a faculty class advisor. Also, numerous community service opportunities are coordinated by the student volunteer council. Club leaders meet quarterly as a Club Council.

Following is a brief listing of some of the more than forty activities offered at Savannah Country Day Upper School. Seven of the co-curricular organizations go to regional competitions, including Theatre15, Mock Trial, the Quiz Bowl, and the Math Team.

Clubs & Co-curricular Activities
Amanuensis

Art Guild

C-SAW

Chess Club

Class Officers

Council of World Affairs

Country Data

Crew

Cum Laude Society

Discipline Committee

Environmental Awareness

Fellowship Group

Film Society

Grace House

Habitat for Humanity

Honor Council

Hospice

Lower School Tutoring

Magdalene House

Math Team

Med-Bank

Mock Trial

Musical

National Honor Society

Peer Helpers

Pinpoint Book Club

Quiz Bowl

Ronald McDonald House

SALSA

Second Harvest Food Bank

Share

Spirit Club

St. Mary's

Student Council

Student Guides

Students for Cultural Diversity

Theatre 15

Volunteer Council

Wesley Community Center
Volunteer Opportunities
Red Cross
Contact Us
Mr. Stephen 'Steve' Kolman
Head of the Upper School 
912.961.8730

Mrs. Leigh Beauchamp
Upper School Dean of Students
912.961.8694

Mrs. Kathleen 'Kathy' Hodges
Upper School Guidance Counselor
912.961.8676

Mrs. Kayla Johnson
Assistant to the Head of Upper School 
912.961.8681
Upper School News
Ask Anything....
9/8/2014
Several weeks ago, Upper School faculty member Adam Weber reconnected with a former student, Ben Winterhalter ’03, who is currently an editor with the online magazine HippoReads. After hearing about Ben’s new column, Ask Anything, he challenged his Honors Physics class to pen questions for guest expert David Kaiser,  Theoretical Physicist and Historian of Science at MIT. Of the submitted questions, freshman Bella Savell was one of four selected to be featured in the published column. http://read.hipporeads.com/is-time-travel-possible-what-shape-is-the-universe-whats-the-deal-with-wormholes/


Freshman Weekend
9/8/2014
An annual tradition for rising ninth graders, Freshman Weekend is a wonderful opportunity to reconnect with classmates and meet new friends. The three-day trip to North Carolina included a rafting excursion down the Nantahala, cardboard boat races and other team-building activities. Seniors joined the in fun as well, getting to know the underclassmen and sharing their own Upper School experiences. By the time the weekend was over, the ninth grade class was fired up for the year ahead!


Honor Code Jeopardy
9/8/2014
Coming up with engaging ways to review the policies of the honor code and student handbook can be tricky… That is why this year’s Discipline Committee and Honor Council decided to engage fellow students in an interactive game of Jeopardy. Contestants reviewed mock scenarios while audience members cheered and applauded.  The morning assembly was a creative and engaging way for our student leaders to reinforce the School’s commitment to the honor code.  Click here to view a short video.


Physics Class Tests Age-Old Theory
9/8/2014
Mr. Weber’s College Physics class headed outside to see if they could answer the question, "Which is faster in the first 3 meters of a race, a human, bike or car?" Using motion sensors and graphical analysis, students tested a human, a bike and a car to see which one has the greatest acceleration. If you look back in history, at the beginning of the advent of the steam engine, many people wondered if it was necessary to create all that noise.  The horse was just as fast and was much less expensive to operate.  Throughout that period, there were a number of races between a horse and a steam engine with the horse winning many of them, but not all. Mr. Weber’s lab replicated those races and explored under what conditions each of these methods of movement (running, biking or driving), would “win a race.”