The Savannah Country Day School

Service Through Knowledge and Character
Academics
Upper School
The cornerstone of our Upper School experience is balance, and we strongly encourage students to find interests beyond the classroom to augment their academic experience.  The vast majority of students take more arts courses than are required for graduation, and many find expression in multiple artistic endeavors.  The majority of students also participate in at least one varsity sport over the course of the year.  Many students do both, which creates the sort of renaissance student who is emblematic of the Country Day ethic.
 
In addition, there are numerous opportunities for students to find their interests in clubs and other extra-curricular activities.  These allow students to strengthen their leadership muscles, and to develop the sorts of relationships with other students and with mentor faculty members that enhance the learning experience.  There are numerous clubs and volunteer organizations on the Upper School campus which affords students opportunities to help those in the community and beyond, or simply have fun with friends both old and new.



List of 6 items.

  • Upper School at a Glance

    • 260 students in the Upper School
    • Average class size of 14.7, student/teacher ratio 6:1
    • Average faculty experience is 15 years—80% hold advanced degrees
    • 100% of graduates attend Four-Year colleges
    • 78% of Upper School students participate in a varsity sport
    • A far-reaching curriculum including Honors, Advanced Placement, and Advanced classes
    • Over 80% of those taking AP tests achieve passing scores
    • Orchestra, Chorus, Jazz Band and Drama anchor our performing arts offerings
    • A diverse array of Electives including Urban Planning, World Religions, Marine Biology, Comparative Religion, Geechee-Gullah Literature and Culture and Recasting Children's Literature in the Adult Canon.
    • Seniors participate in off-campus research or career education project during the month of May. 
    • Study abroad is available through a student exchange program.
  • Advisory Program

    Because it is important for each student to from relationships with the adults in our community, all students have faculty advisors who are assigned in the ninth grade and the groups stay together for four years. This affords students and faculty the opportunity to create the kinds of bonds that can only be forged over time.  Advisors meet regularly with advisees to review academic progress and to help students set goals in any areas needing improvement. Advisors also meet with students each spring to plan courses for the following year. Parents may contact their student’s advisor to check on progress, to seek assistance, or to provide the school with information relevant to the student’s success.
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  • Leadership, Clubs & Organizations

    Students are also encouraged to explore their talents and interests beyond their classroom experiences through participation in co-curricular activities.  Opportunities abound to explore, strengthen, and cultivate numerous interests and peer relationships and through our great variety of opportunities available, students are able to develop skills in leadership and collaborative work.  If a club does not exist and there is interest, we encourage students to work in collaboration with each other and the faculty to meet the need

    Student Leadership: Students are given the chance to represent the student body in several areas. Elections are held each year to fill spots on Student Council, Honor Council, and Discipline Committee.  In addition, four elected officials, who plan class activities such as community service events or prom, represent each class.

    The Buzz: Upper School students are invited to participate in the creation of a quarterly newspaper, and work together as an editorial team.

    Community Projects: Community projects allow students to give back to the community at large and teach all Hornets to care for those without a voice. Service learning is a key component of the education values at Country Day and unlike many schools, is not a graduation requirement, but an expectation. Opportunities range from Second Harvest Food Bank, Habitat for Humanity, Humane Society, LS/MS Tutoring, Ronald McDonald House, Hospice Teens and H.O.P.E. The latter organization was formed by a Country Day student, and has become an important part of caring for children at Memorial Hospital

    School Clubs and Organizations: School Clubs and Organizations allow students the opportunity to extend their curricular interests. The scope of these clubs and organizations is limited only by the range of the students who create and work for them, and include the following:

    SHARE Mentoring Program
    Sailing
    Science Bowl
    Students Celebrating Diversity
    Sushi Club
    SALSA (Students Advocating Living without Substance Abuse)
    Mock Trial
    Cooking for a Cause
    Fellowship of Christian Athletes
    T.R.E.E (The Real Environment Enthusiasts)
    Amanuesis—the student literary and arts magazine
    Math Team
    World Affairs
    Quiz Bowl
    Asian Culture Club
    Cyanotype Club
    Archery Club
  • Electives

    Country Day offers a multitude of robust and distinct classes, each taught by passionate faculty who developed them out of their own interests. Electives offer students the opportunity to delve into a contemporary subject that is outside the traditional means of required coursework. Offerings include Urban Planning, Neuro-Biology, Comparative Religion, Gullah-Geechee and Recasting Children's Literature in the Adult Canon.
  • The Honor Code

    Central to our mission at The Savannah Country Day School is the Honor Code.  There are things that are even more important than academic success, and our emphasis on the Honor Code is designed to emphasize the importance of creating citizens with an ethical and moral core. Every student is honor-bound to refrain from lying, cheating, or stealing, and every member of the school community takes an active role in adhering to, upholding, and promoting our Honor Code.  This emphasizes the fact that honesty and integrity are the foundation on which SCDS is built, and the cornerstone of our community. Upper School students sign and pledge their adherence to the Honor Code on every paper and test, and each student will, during his or her time in the Upper School, sign their intent to maintain the Honor Code in the Upper School’s Honor Book.
     
     
  • Guidance

    The Upper School offers a comprehensive guidance program separate and distinct from our College Counseling curriculum.  Our counselor is a licensed clinical social worker who is uniquely prepared to deal with the issues associated with young adults.  Working in conjunction with the school, the students, and our families, our counseling curriculum—which begins in ninth grade with a comprehensive health class—helps students to develop academically, socially, personally, and emotionally.  The counselor can also refer individuals for services outside the school.  Integral to a successful counseling program is confidentiality. The Upper School Counselor follows the American School Counselor Association ethical guidelines regarding confidentiality, which are critical to creating a trusting environment in our school.
     
    In addition, our counselor works with all students with documented learning differences, to ensure that each student has all of the tools at his or her disposal to be a success at Country Day.  This may include applying for extended time on standardized tests, and our counselor also monitors this program.